linda darnell

Linda Darnell ‘What I Got Don’t Need Beads’ – Episode 23

Linda Darnell was hardcore. A Madonna face with an ice heart. She was also funny, generous, extremely giving of her time, loved Mexican food and palling around with her bestie Ann Miller. Instead of being labelled a ‘tragedy’, we here at Any Ladle’s Sweet wish to celebrate Linda by discussing 3 of her finest roles: Forever Amber (1947), A Letter to Three Wives (1949) and No Way Out (1950). Come children…

Resources:
A Letter to Three Wives (1949) Dir. Joseph L. Mankiewicz [DVD] 20th Century Fox.

Davis, R.L. (1991) Hollywood Beauty: Linda Darnell and the American Dream, Norman: University of Oklahoma Press.

Forever Amber (1947) Dir. Otto Preminger [YouTube] 20th Century Fox.

No Way Out (1950) Dir. Joseph L. Mankiewicz [YouTube] 20th Century Fox.

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gloria grahame

Gloria Grahame – Sister Under the Mink – Episode 21

This month we’re righting some wrongs here at Any Ladle’s Sweet. Gloria Grahame shone in support roles in many noir films, under many great directors but she references her mother as her only influence on her acting style. Negative stories surrounding her personal life overtook her talent and hard work and fact and fiction mixed into a tawdry Hollywood Babylon style mess. Gloria was a unique talent and we are here to celebrate her hard work and mesmerising onscreen presence. We discuss 3 of her finest, In a Lonely Place (1950), The Big Heat (1953), and Human Desire (1954).

Sources:
Callahan, D. (2008) ‘Fatal Instincts: The Dangerous Pout of Gloria Grahame’

Bright Lights 30 April [Available at: brightlightsfilm.com/fatal-instinct…/#.WX9Yq4jyvIV].

Chase, D (1997) ‘Gloria Grahame: In Praise of the Dirty Mind’ Film Comment September/October [Available at: www.filmcomment.com/article/gloria-grahame/].

Curcio, V. (1989) Suicide Blonde: The Life of Gloria Grahame. New York: William Morrow and Company.

Eisenschitz, B. (1996) Nicholas Ray: An American Journey translated by Tom Milne. New York: Faber & Faber.

Gunning, T. (2000) The Films of Fritz Lang: Allegories of Vision and Modernity. London, BFI with Palgrave Macmillan.

Hagen, R and Wagner, L. (2004) Killer Tomatoes: Fifteen Tough Noir Dames. Jefferson: McFarland.

Human Desire (1954) Dir. Fritz Lang [YouTube] Columbia Pictures.

In a Lonely Place (1950) Dir. Nicholas Ray. [DVR] Columbia Pictures.

Ray, N. (1993) I Was Interrupted: Nicholas Ray on Making Movies Berkeley: University of California Press.

Rickey, C. (2017) ‘In a Lonely Place: Film noir as an opera of male fury’

Library of America 28 June [Available at: www.loa.org/news-and-views/1301…-opera-of-male-fury].

The Big Heat (1953) Dir. Fritz Lang [DVD] Columbia Pictures.

Turner, P. (1986) Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool. London: Pan Books.

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carole lombard

Carole Lombard: Hoyden, Screwball, Mogul in the Making – Episode 17

Ice-blonde with blue piercing eyes and great gams, Carole surprised many with her salty tongue, endless pranks and keen head for business and publicity. A screwball comedy queen, she also had a big heart when it came to looking after everyone she came into contact with, on and off the set. A proto feminist, she strived for better contracts and demanded her way when it came to choosing writers, directors and cinematographers for her projects. Her life was tragically brief so we want to pay homage to this great lady who was really just getting started. In episode 17 we discuss Virtue (1932), No Man of Her Own (1932) and My Man, Godfrey (1936).

Sources:
Bogdanovich, P. (1997) Who the Devil Made It: Conversations with Legendary Film Directors New York: Ballantine Books.

Carman, E. (2016) Independent Stardom: Freelance Women in the Hollywood Studio System. Austin: University of Texas Press.

My Man Godfrey (1936) Dir. Gregory La Cava [YouTube] Universal Pictures.

No Man of Her Own (1932) Dir. Wesley Ruggles [DVD] Paramount Pictures.

Swindell, L. (1975) Screwball: The Life of Carole Lombard Brattleboro: Echo Point Books and Media.

Virtue (1932) Dir. Edward Buzzell [DVD] Columbia Pictures.

Ott W. Frederick. (1972) The Films of Carole Lombard: The Citadel Press

sensesofcinema.com/2011/cteq/my-man-godfrey/

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Crime Queens: Outlaw Women in Film 1930 – 1950 – Episode 6

Our sixth episode focuses on the women who turn to crime out of desperation, no femme fatales here, just real women swapping the mop for a gun. We reference our third episode on the Pre-codes (wherein women used their sexuality to gain social mobility} to women now turning to crime to climb out of poverty. The films we discuss include Paid (1930), Ladies They Talk About (1933), Blondie Johnson (1933), Gun Crazy (1950) and Caged (1950).

In keeping with our crime theme we devote some quality time to the fabulous Robert Mitchum in our He’s a Keeper segment.

Crime Queens: Outlaw Women in Film 1930 – 1950 – Episode 6 by Any Ladle’s Sweet

Our sixth episode focuses on the women who turn to crime out of desperation, no femme fatale’s here, just real women swapping the mop for a gun. We reference our third episode on the Pre-codes (wherein women used their sexuality to gain social mobility} to women now turning to crime to climb out of poverty.

Sources:
Blondie Johnson (1933) Dir. Ray Enright [DVD] Warner Bros.
Caged (1950) Dir. John Cromwell [DVD] Warner Bros.
Cape Fear (1962) Dir. J. Lee Thompson [DVD] Universal.
Gun Crazy (1950) Dir. Joseph H. Lewis [DVD] United Artists.
Jaggar, A. M., & Bordo, S. (1989). Gender/body/knowledge: Feminist reconstructions of being and knowing. New Brunswick, N.J: Rutgers University Press.
Ladies They Talk About (1933) Dir. Howard Bretherton and William Keighley [DVD] Warner Bros.
Out of the Past (1947) Dir. Jacques Tourneur [DVD] RKO.
Paid (1930) Dir. Sam Wood [DVD] MGM.
Russell, J. (1985) Jane Russell: An Autobiography London: Sidgwick & Jackson.
The Lusty Men (1952) Dir. Nicholas Ray [DVD] RKO.
The Night of the Hunter (1955) Dir. Charles Laughton [DVD] United Artists.
Thirteen Women (1932) Dir. George Archainbaud [Internet Archive] RKO.
Brainy Broads essay from Smart Chicks on Screen, Sheri Chinen Biesen

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