anita loos

Anita Loos – Queen of Wit and Sass Supreme – Episode 24

In episode 24, we discuss the darling of the silent intertitle, mother of sass mouth dames in early talking pictures, raconteur, and all-round solid gold good guy, Anita Loos. We discuss selections of her witty writing on her experience working in Hollywood during the golden era. Stories from Kiss Hollywood Goodbye (1974), Fate Keeps on Happening (1984), Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1925) and A Girl Like I (1966). We also discuss two of her finest scriptwriting examples in Blondie of the Follies (1932) and The Girl From Missouri (1934). This is our last episode, thanks to all our listeners and we hope you enjoyed our series!

Sources:
Beauchamp, C. and Loos, M.A., Eds. (2003) Anita Loos Rediscovered: Film Treatments and Fiction by Anita Loos. Berkeley: University of California Press.
Beauchamp, C. (1997) Without Lying Down: Frances Marion and the Powerful Women of Early Hollywood Berkeley: University of California Press.
Blondie of the Follies (1932) Dir. Edmund Goulding [DVD] MGM.
Carey, G. (1988) Anita Loos: A Biography London: Bloomsbury.
Loos, A. (1925) Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1992) London: Penguin.
Loos, A. (1966) A Girl Like I New York: Viking.
Loos, A. (1974) Kiss Hollywood Goodbye London: W.H Allen.
Loos, A. (1977) Cast of Thousands New York: Grosset & Dunlap.
Loos, A. (1984) Fate Keeps on Happening: Adventures of Lorelei Lee and Other Writings. London: Harrap.
Red-Headed Woman (1932) Dir. Jack Conway [DVD] MGM.
The Girl from Missouri (1934) Dir. Jack Conway [DVD] MGM.

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sass mouth dames film club

Sass Mouth Dames Film Club

Series Two!

sass mouth dames film club

Hollywood used to believe that for a picture to be successful, it had to appeal to women.

Join us as we screen five films every Thursday, that put women front and centre from January 11th to February 8th in Dublin’s Denzille Private Cinema.

Get your tickets

Soft drinks, tea & coffee, snacks included.

Please be seated by 19.10 for the screenings.

Films:

What Price Hollywood? (1932) Starring Constance Bennett and directed by George Cukor (11 Jan) Preview clip – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K9UBH4r0sG4

Three on a Match (1932) Starring Bette Davis, Joan Blondell & Ann Dvorak (18 Jan)

Trailer – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vM1_5XAiZKA

Gold Diggers of 1933 (1933) Starring Ginger Rogers, Joan Blondell, Ruby Keeler, Aline MacMahon, Ned Sparks and Warren William (25 Jan)

Preview clip – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UJOjTNuuEVw

Ann Vickers (1933) Starring Irene Dunne and Walter Huston (1 Feb)

Preview clip – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UzHjOvTB0Yc

Design for Living (1933) Starring Miriam Hopkins, Gary Cooper and Fredric March (8 Feb)

Trailer – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2dkk6XosYzY

We’re non-profit, just spreading the woman’s picture gospel.

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carole lombard

Carole Lombard: Hoyden, Screwball, Mogul in the Making – Episode 17

Ice-blonde with blue piercing eyes and great gams, Carole surprised many with her salty tongue, endless pranks and keen head for business and publicity. A screwball comedy queen, she also had a big heart when it came to looking after everyone she came into contact with, on and off the set. A proto feminist, she strived for better contracts and demanded her way when it came to choosing writers, directors and cinematographers for her projects. Her life was tragically brief so we want to pay homage to this great lady who was really just getting started. In episode 17 we discuss Virtue (1932), No Man of Her Own (1932) and My Man, Godfrey (1936).

Sources:
Bogdanovich, P. (1997) Who the Devil Made It: Conversations with Legendary Film Directors New York: Ballantine Books.

Carman, E. (2016) Independent Stardom: Freelance Women in the Hollywood Studio System. Austin: University of Texas Press.

My Man Godfrey (1936) Dir. Gregory La Cava [YouTube] Universal Pictures.

No Man of Her Own (1932) Dir. Wesley Ruggles [DVD] Paramount Pictures.

Swindell, L. (1975) Screwball: The Life of Carole Lombard Brattleboro: Echo Point Books and Media.

Virtue (1932) Dir. Edward Buzzell [DVD] Columbia Pictures.

Ott W. Frederick. (1972) The Films of Carole Lombard: The Citadel Press

sensesofcinema.com/2011/cteq/my-man-godfrey/

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barbara stanwyck

Barbara Stanwyck: Ball of Fire – Episode 15

Bright, hard boiled yet deeply human, earthy, independent, consummate professional, passionate, conservative, world weary, astute, confident, funny, strong, loyal…you really can’t pin Barbara Stanwyck down to any one thing. In episode 15 we discuss (in our humble opinion) three films that showcase her best work – Ladies of Leisure (1930), Stella Dallas (1937), and Clash by Night (1952).

Stay tuned for episode 16 in which we discuss the wonderful Joan Bennett followed in episode 17 with the queen of slapstick herself, Carole Lombard!

Sources:
Ankerich, M.G. (2015) Dangerous Curves atop Hollywood Heels: The Lives, Careers, and Misfortunes of 14 Hard-Luck Girls of the Silent Screen. Albany: BearManor Media.

Bogdanovich, P. (1997) Who The Devil Made It: Conversations with Legendary Film Directors. New York: Ballantine Books.

Callahan, D. (2011) Barbara Stanwyck The Miracle Woman. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi.

Capra, F. (1997) The Name above the Title: An Autobiography. Boston: DaCapo Press.

Clash by Night (1952). Dir. Fritz Lang [DVD] RKO Pictures.

Ladies of Leisure (1930) Dir. Frank Capra [DVD} Columbia Pictures.

Stella Dallas (1937) Dir. King Vidor [DVD} United Artists.

Wilson, V. (2013) A Life of Barbara Stanwyck: Steel True 1907-1940. New York: Simon and Schuster.

Carman, Emily (2016) Independent Stardom: Freelance Women in the Hollywood Studio System. University of Texas Press

Scandals of Classic Hollywood: The Many Faces of Barbara Stanwyck –thehairpin.com/scandals-of-class…8648a2#.w82nq07ge

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bette davis

Sisters under the Skin – All About Bette – Episode 14

Part 2 of our ‘Sisters under the Skin’ series, of which Joan Crawford was featured in part 1, this episode is all about Bette. We celebrate a queen of Woman’s Pictures through three of her finest films: Of Human Bondage (1934), Marked Woman (1937) and Now, Voyager (1942).

This is also our last episode of the year but we will return in January fresh smelling with the fabulous Barbara Stanwyck.

Sisters under the Skin – All About Bette – Episode 14 by Any Ladle’s Sweet

Part 2 of our ‘Sisters under the Skin’ series, of which Joan Crawford was featured in part 1, this episode is all about Bette. We celebrate a queen of Woman’s Pictures through three of her finest films: Of Human Bondage (1934), Marked Woman (1937) and Now, Voyager (1942).

Sources:
Considine, S. (1989) Bette & Joan: The Divine Feud. New York: Dutton.

Davis, B. (1962) The Lonely Life. (with Sanford Dody). New York: Lancer Books.

— (1987) This ‘N That (with Michael Herskowitz). New York: Putnam.

Dody, S. (1980) Giving Up the Ghost: A Writer’s Life Among the Stars. Lanham: M Evans and Co.

Eckert, C. (1973) ‘The Anatomy of a Proletarian Film: Warner’s Marked Woman’ Film Quarterly Vol. 27 No. 2 (Winter 1973-1974) pp. 10-24.

Fuller, E. (1992) Me and Jezebel New York: Berkley.

Marked Woman (1937) Dir. Lloyd Bacon [DVD] Warner Brothers.

Now Voyager (1942) Dir. Irving Rapper [DVD] Warner Brothers.

Of Human Bondage (1934) Dir. James Cromwell [YouTube] RKO Pictures.

Sherman, V. (1996) Studio Affairs: My Life as a Film Director. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.

Stine, W. (1974) Mother Goddamn: Bette Davis Hawthorn Books.

sensesofcinema.com/2001/feature-articles/spinster/

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