linda darnell

Linda Darnell ‘What I Got Don’t Need Beads’ – Episode 23

Linda Darnell was hardcore. A Madonna face with an ice heart. She was also funny, generous, extremely giving of her time, loved Mexican food and palling around with her bestie Ann Miller. Instead of being labelled a ‘tragedy’, we here at Any Ladle’s Sweet wish to celebrate Linda by discussing 3 of her finest roles: Forever Amber (1947), A Letter to Three Wives (1949) and No Way Out (1950). Come children…

Resources:
A Letter to Three Wives (1949) Dir. Joseph L. Mankiewicz [DVD] 20th Century Fox.

Davis, R.L. (1991) Hollywood Beauty: Linda Darnell and the American Dream, Norman: University of Oklahoma Press.

Forever Amber (1947) Dir. Otto Preminger [YouTube] 20th Century Fox.

No Way Out (1950) Dir. Joseph L. Mankiewicz [YouTube] 20th Century Fox.

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rosalind russell

Rosalind Russell: Dollface Hick – Episode 22

Orry-Kelly recalled a conversation with Roz during the filming of Auntie Mame “On one occasion I said to her ‘You know, you’re a pretty wonderful girl and you’ve been a wonderful wife. In fact, you’ve been a wonderful mother.’ A naughty Mame-ish gleam came into her eyes as she said, ‘Yes, and I’m a hell of a lover’”. Episode 22 is devoted to this gargantuan superwoman of the silver screen. A unique comedic talent who always displayed class and good humour in whatever picture she worked on. In our opinion, Roz was ‘top drawer’. We discuss three of her finest: The Women (1939), His Girl Friday (1940), and Auntie Mame (1958).

THAT outfit, long thought deleted from the final version of the film but we found its brief appearance!

rosalind russellrosalind russell

Resources:
Auntie Mame (1958) Dir. Morton DaCosta [DVD] Warner Bros.
Dennis, P. (1955) Auntie Mame: An Irreverent Escapade New York: Penguin.
Haskell, M. (1973) From Reverence to Rape: The Treatment of Women in the Movies Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
His Girl Friday (1940) Dir. Howard Hawks [YouTube] Columbia Pictures.
Life is a Banquet: The Rosalind Russell Story (2009) Narr. Kathleen Turner [DVD] Total Media Group.
Russell, R. (1977) Life is a Banquet (with Chris Chase) New York: Ace Books.
The Women (1939) Dir. George Cukor [DVD] MGM.
seul-le-cinema.blogspot.ie/2008/12/women-1939.html
www.criterion.com/current/posts/43…rfect-remarriage

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gloria grahame

Gloria Grahame – Sister Under the Mink – Episode 21

This month we’re righting some wrongs here at Any Ladle’s Sweet. Gloria Grahame shone in support roles in many noir films, under many great directors but she references her mother as her only influence on her acting style. Negative stories surrounding her personal life overtook her talent and hard work and fact and fiction mixed into a tawdry Hollywood Babylon style mess. Gloria was a unique talent and we are here to celebrate her hard work and mesmerising onscreen presence. We discuss 3 of her finest, In a Lonely Place (1950), The Big Heat (1953), and Human Desire (1954).

Sources:
Callahan, D. (2008) ‘Fatal Instincts: The Dangerous Pout of Gloria Grahame’

Bright Lights 30 April [Available at: brightlightsfilm.com/fatal-instinct…/#.WX9Yq4jyvIV].

Chase, D (1997) ‘Gloria Grahame: In Praise of the Dirty Mind’ Film Comment September/October [Available at: www.filmcomment.com/article/gloria-grahame/].

Curcio, V. (1989) Suicide Blonde: The Life of Gloria Grahame. New York: William Morrow and Company.

Eisenschitz, B. (1996) Nicholas Ray: An American Journey translated by Tom Milne. New York: Faber & Faber.

Gunning, T. (2000) The Films of Fritz Lang: Allegories of Vision and Modernity. London, BFI with Palgrave Macmillan.

Hagen, R and Wagner, L. (2004) Killer Tomatoes: Fifteen Tough Noir Dames. Jefferson: McFarland.

Human Desire (1954) Dir. Fritz Lang [YouTube] Columbia Pictures.

In a Lonely Place (1950) Dir. Nicholas Ray. [DVR] Columbia Pictures.

Ray, N. (1993) I Was Interrupted: Nicholas Ray on Making Movies Berkeley: University of California Press.

Rickey, C. (2017) ‘In a Lonely Place: Film noir as an opera of male fury’

Library of America 28 June [Available at: www.loa.org/news-and-views/1301…-opera-of-male-fury].

The Big Heat (1953) Dir. Fritz Lang [DVD] Columbia Pictures.

Turner, P. (1986) Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool. London: Pan Books.

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louise brooks

Louise Brooks – Naked on Her Goat – Episode 20

Actress Dorothy Mackaill said of Louise “She was a peculiar girl, odd, different but she was damned attractive, and I’d say good-humoured, not difficult about it all. She used to laugh and shrug her shoulders and say ‘the hell with it’. But they got what they wanted. All they had to do with Brooksie was turn the camera on.” There really was no one like Louise and we’re dedicating our twentieth episode to this enigmatic dancer turned actress turned writer. We discuss 3 of her finest films: Pandora’s Box (1929), The Diary of a Lost Girl (1929) and Prix de beauté (1930).

Viva Louise!

Resources:
Brooks, L. (1982) Lulu in Hollywood New York: Knopf.

Eisner, Lotte. (1952) The Haunted Screen: Expressionism in the German Cinema and the Influence of Max Reinhardt: University of California Press

sensesofcinema.com/2010/feature-ar…-tabula-rasa-3/

Bright Lights Film Journal [Available at: brightlightsfilm.com/martyrdom-lulu-louise-brooks- 100/#.WWSi7YTyvIU].

Diary of a Lost Girl (1929) Dir. G.W. Pabst [DVD] Pabst-Film.

Pandora’s Box (1929) Dir. G.W. Pabst [DVD] Süd-Film.

Paris, B. (1989) Louise Brooks New York: Knopf.

Prix de Beauté (1930). Dir. Augusto Genina [internet archive] Sofar-Film.

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irene dunne

Irene Dunne – ‘She longed to be called baby’ – Episode 19

Irene Dunne was the queen of melodrama, comedy and musicals, a leading lady adored by all and seen by female audiences as an ‘every woman’. Many critics over the years have labelled Irene as either the ‘female Cary Grant’ or the refined lady who excelled in maternal roles. We at Any Ladle’s Sweet beg to differ and offer a more nuanced view of this deeply funny lady who always longed to be called ‘baby’. We discuss 3 of her finest roles: Ann Vickers (1933, Theodora Goes Wild (1936), and Unfinished Business (1941).

Sources:
Ann Vickers (1933). Dir. John Cromwell [DVD] RKO Pictures.

Basinger, J. (2007) The Star Machine. New York: Vintage.

Bawden, J. and Miller, R. (2016) Conversations with Classic Film Stars: Interviews from Hollywood’s Golden Era. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.

Bogdonovich, P. (1997) Who the Devil Made It: Conversations with Legendary Film Directors. New York: Ballantine.

Carman, E. (2016) Independent Stardom: Freelance Women in the Hollywood Studio System. Austin: University of Texas Press.

Douglas, M. (1986) See You at the Movies: The Autobiography of Melvyn Douglas. (with Tom Arthur) Lanham: University Press of America.

Gehring, W.D. (2006) Irene Dunne: First Lady of Hollywood. Lanham: Scarecrow Press.

McCourt: J. (1980) ‘Irene Dunne: The Awful Truth’ Film Comment 16.1 pp. 26-32.

Theodora Goes Wild (1936) Dir. Richard Boleslawski [YouTube] Columbia Pictures.

Unfinished Business (1941) Dir. Gregory La Cava [YouTube] Universal Studios.

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