barbara stanwyck

Barbara Stanwyck: Ball of Fire – Episode 15

Bright, hard boiled yet deeply human, earthy, independent, consummate professional, passionate, conservative, world weary, astute, confident, funny, strong, loyal…you really can’t pin Barbara Stanwyck down to any one thing. In episode 15 we discuss (in our humble opinion) three films that showcase her best work – Ladies of Leisure (1930), Stella Dallas (1937), and Clash by Night (1952).

Stay tuned for episode 16 in which we discuss the wonderful Joan Bennett followed in episode 17 with the queen of slapstick herself, Carole Lombard!

Sources:
Ankerich, M.G. (2015) Dangerous Curves atop Hollywood Heels: The Lives, Careers, and Misfortunes of 14 Hard-Luck Girls of the Silent Screen. Albany: BearManor Media.

Bogdanovich, P. (1997) Who The Devil Made It: Conversations with Legendary Film Directors. New York: Ballantine Books.

Callahan, D. (2011) Barbara Stanwyck The Miracle Woman. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi.

Capra, F. (1997) The Name above the Title: An Autobiography. Boston: DaCapo Press.

Clash by Night (1952). Dir. Fritz Lang [DVD] RKO Pictures.

Ladies of Leisure (1930) Dir. Frank Capra [DVD} Columbia Pictures.

Stella Dallas (1937) Dir. King Vidor [DVD} United Artists.

Wilson, V. (2013) A Life of Barbara Stanwyck: Steel True 1907-1940. New York: Simon and Schuster.

Carman, Emily (2016) Independent Stardom: Freelance Women in the Hollywood Studio System. University of Texas Press

Scandals of Classic Hollywood: The Many Faces of Barbara Stanwyck –thehairpin.com/scandals-of-class…8648a2#.w82nq07ge

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bette davis

Sisters under the Skin – All About Bette – Episode 14

Part 2 of our ‘Sisters under the Skin’ series, of which Joan Crawford was featured in part 1, this episode is all about Bette. We celebrate a queen of Woman’s Pictures through three of her finest films: Of Human Bondage (1934), Marked Woman (1937) and Now, Voyager (1942).

This is also our last episode of the year but we will return in January fresh smelling with the fabulous Barbara Stanwyck.

Sisters under the Skin – All About Bette – Episode 14 by Any Ladle’s Sweet

Part 2 of our ‘Sisters under the Skin’ series, of which Joan Crawford was featured in part 1, this episode is all about Bette. We celebrate a queen of Woman’s Pictures through three of her finest films: Of Human Bondage (1934), Marked Woman (1937) and Now, Voyager (1942).

Sources:
Considine, S. (1989) Bette & Joan: The Divine Feud. New York: Dutton.

Davis, B. (1962) The Lonely Life. (with Sanford Dody). New York: Lancer Books.

— (1987) This ‘N That (with Michael Herskowitz). New York: Putnam.

Dody, S. (1980) Giving Up the Ghost: A Writer’s Life Among the Stars. Lanham: M Evans and Co.

Eckert, C. (1973) ‘The Anatomy of a Proletarian Film: Warner’s Marked Woman’ Film Quarterly Vol. 27 No. 2 (Winter 1973-1974) pp. 10-24.

Fuller, E. (1992) Me and Jezebel New York: Berkley.

Marked Woman (1937) Dir. Lloyd Bacon [DVD] Warner Brothers.

Now Voyager (1942) Dir. Irving Rapper [DVD] Warner Brothers.

Of Human Bondage (1934) Dir. James Cromwell [YouTube] RKO Pictures.

Sherman, V. (1996) Studio Affairs: My Life as a Film Director. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.

Stine, W. (1974) Mother Goddamn: Bette Davis Hawthorn Books.

sensesofcinema.com/2001/feature-articles/spinster/

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The Melodramas Part 1: John M. Stahl – From Back Street to Heaven – Episode 11

Episode 11! Part 1 of a 2 part series on the melodramas of the ’30’s and ’50’s starting with the films of John M. Stahl. Stahl directed some of the most popular films of the romantic melodrama genre through the 1930’s, some of which would go on to be remade in glorious technicolor by Douglas Sirk in the 1950’s. He was forgotten in film history for many decades mostly due to the lack of availability of any decent prints. A resurgence of interest in his work was sparked by the Universal Pictures under Laemmle Jr retrospective in MoMA last year. For the first time since their release audiences were able to experience the pristine and slow burning beauty of Stahl’s films, where women were the centre of action and interest.

We also discuss the other forgotten man of that time, Laemmle Jr.

Charles Boyer is discussed in loving detail in our He’s a Keeper segment.

The Melodramas Part 1: John M. Stahl – From Back Street to Heaven – Episode 11 by Any Ladle’s Sweet

Episode 11! Part 1 of a 2 part series on the melodramas of the ’30’s and ’50’s starting with the films of John M. Stahl. Stahl directed some of the most popular films of the romantic melodrama genre through the 1930’s, some of which would go on to be remade in glorious technicolor by Douglas Sirk in the 1950’s.

Sources:
An Affair to Remember (1957) Dir. Leo McCarey [YouTube] Twentieth Century Fox.

Back Street (1932) Dir. John M Stahl [YouTube] Universal Pictures.

Back Street (1941) Dir. Robert Stevenson [Daily Motion] Universal Pictures.

Bawden, J. and Miller, R. (2016) ‘Interview with Irene Dunne’ in Conversations with Classic

Film Stars: Interviews from Hollywood’s Golden Era. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.

Gaslight (1944) Dir. George Cukor [DVD] Metro-Goldwyn- Mayer.

Hold Back the Dawn (1941) Dir. Mitchell Leisen [DVD] Paramount Pictures.

Imitation of Life (1934) Dir. John M Stahl [DVD] Universal Pictures.

Leave Her to Heaven (1945) Dir. John M Stahl [DVD] Universal Pictures.

Le Bonheur (1934) Dir. Marcel L’Herbier [Internet Archive] Universal Pictures.

Liliom (1934) Dir. Fritz Lang. [YouTube] Fox Film Corporation/ Fox Europa.

Love Affair (1939) Dir. Leo McCarey [YouTube] RKO Pictures.

Magnificent Obsession (1935) Dir. John M Stahl [DVD] Universal Pictures.

Only Yesterday (1933) Dir. John M Stahl [YouTube] Universal Pictures.

Swindell, L. (1983) The Reluctant Lover: Charles Boyer. New York: Doubleday.

The Earrings of Madame de … (1953) Dir. Max Ophüls [DVD] Gaumont (France)Arlan (US).

When Tomorrow Comes (1939) Dir. John M Stahl [DVD] Universal Pictures.

brightlightsfilm.com/women-love-thr…/#.V69xApgrKM9

sensesofcinema.com/2014/feature-ar…irks-interlude/

www.filmcomment.com/blog/the-high-t…carl-lammle-jr/

Closing music from Where Does Love Go (1966) ‘La Vie En Rose’ sung by Charles Boyer

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Fizz on the Soda: Ginger Rogers and Joan Blondell – Episode 9

Episode 9! This month we’re discussing women in showbusiness, focusing on two stars who started out their film careers pounding the stage circuit hoping to make it big. Ginger Rogers and Joan Blondell. He’s a Keeper this month is the wonderful Peter Lorre.

In the 1930’s, Hollywood became expert at creating fantasies for its audiences. Beautiful girls in skimpy costumes. in Busby Berkley designed spectacles singing ‘We’re in the money, we’re in the money’ gave audiences a momentary escape from the greyness and worry of reality. The Great Depression affected all Americans and led to thousands of movie theaters closing and ticket sales plummeted, in saying that Hollywood was still in the business of entertaining people. In 1933 60 million people still went to the movies. Life on the stage was very tough with thousands of girls audtioning and only a handful making it in the pick. Backstage there would be 25 girls to one dressing room, bad lighting, everyone stealing each others make-up, in-fighting and holding off advances from creepy stage managers. Ginger and Joan came up the hard way and by 1933 were two of biggest stars at the time.

Curtain up!

Fizz on the Soda: Ginger Rogers and Joan Blondell – Episode 9 by Any Ladle’s Sweet

Episode 9! This month we’re discussing women in showbusiness, focusing on two stars who started out their film careers pounding the stage circuit hoping to make it big. Ginger Rogers and Joan Blondell. He’s a Keeper this month is the wonderful Peter Lorre. In the 1930’s, Hollywood became expert at creating fantasies for its audiences.

Sources:
42 nd Street (1933) Dir. Lloyd Bacon. [DVD] Warner Bros.

Bawden, J and Miller, R. (2016) ‘Interview with Joan Blondell’ in Conversations with Classic Film Stars: Interviews from Hollywood’s Golden Era. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.

Blondell, J. (1972) Center Door Fancy. New York: Delacorte Press.

Broadway Bad (1933) Dir. Sidney Lanfield. [YouTube] Warner Bros.

Dames (1934) Dir. Ray Enright & Busby Berkeley. [DVD] Warner Bros.

Der Verlorene ‘The Lost One’ (1951) Dir. Peter Lorre [YouTube] National-Filmverleih.

Gold Diggers of 1933 (1933) Dir. Mervyn LeRoy [DVD] Warner Bros.

Havana Widows (1933) Dir. Ray Enright [DVD] Warner Bros.

Kennedy, M. (2007) Joan Blondell: A Life Between Takes. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi.

M (1931) Dir. Fritz Lang [YouTube] Vereinigte Star-Film.

Mad Love (1935) Dir. Karl Freund. [DVD] Metro-Goldwyn- Mayer Studios.

Maltese Falcon (1941) Dir. John Huston [DVD] Warner Bros.

Nightmare Alley (1947) Dir. Edmund Goulding [DVD] 20 th Century Fox.

Professional Sweetheart (1933) Dir. Wiliam A. Seiter [YouTube] RKO.

Stage Door (1937) Dir. Gregory La Cava. [DVD] RKO

Swing Time (1936) Dir. George Stevens [DVD] RKO.

Rogers, G. Ginger: My Story. New York: It Books.

Youngkin, S.D. (2005) The Lost One: A Life of Peter Lorre. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.

Gourley, Catherine. (2008) Rosie and Mrs America: Perceptions of Women in the 1930’s and 1940’s. Twenty First Century Books.

glamourdaze.com/2013/01/inside-a-…ressing-room.html

Music excerpt from 42nd St (1933), music and lyrics by Al Dublin and Harry Warren.

Music excerpt from Gold Diggers of 1933 (1933), music and lyrics by Al Dublin and Harry Warren.

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