rosalind russell

Rosalind Russell: Dollface Hick – Episode 22

Orry-Kelly recalled a conversation with Roz during the filming of Auntie Mame “On one occasion I said to her ‘You know, you’re a pretty wonderful girl and you’ve been a wonderful wife. In fact, you’ve been a wonderful mother.’ A naughty Mame-ish gleam came into her eyes as she said, ‘Yes, and I’m a hell of a lover’”. Episode 22 is devoted to this gargantuan superwoman of the silver screen. A unique comedic talent who always displayed class and good humour in whatever picture she worked on. In our opinion, Roz was ‘top drawer’. We discuss three of her finest: The Women (1939), His Girl Friday (1940), and Auntie Mame (1958).

THAT outfit, long thought deleted from the final version of the film but we found its brief appearance!

rosalind russellrosalind russell

Resources:
Auntie Mame (1958) Dir. Morton DaCosta [DVD] Warner Bros.
Dennis, P. (1955) Auntie Mame: An Irreverent Escapade New York: Penguin.
Haskell, M. (1973) From Reverence to Rape: The Treatment of Women in the Movies Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
His Girl Friday (1940) Dir. Howard Hawks [YouTube] Columbia Pictures.
Life is a Banquet: The Rosalind Russell Story (2009) Narr. Kathleen Turner [DVD] Total Media Group.
Russell, R. (1977) Life is a Banquet (with Chris Chase) New York: Ace Books.
The Women (1939) Dir. George Cukor [DVD] MGM.
seul-le-cinema.blogspot.ie/2008/12/women-1939.html
www.criterion.com/current/posts/43…rfect-remarriage

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barbara stanwyck

Barbara Stanwyck: Ball of Fire – Episode 15

Bright, hard boiled yet deeply human, earthy, independent, consummate professional, passionate, conservative, world weary, astute, confident, funny, strong, loyal…you really can’t pin Barbara Stanwyck down to any one thing. In episode 15 we discuss (in our humble opinion) three films that showcase her best work – Ladies of Leisure (1930), Stella Dallas (1937), and Clash by Night (1952).

Stay tuned for episode 16 in which we discuss the wonderful Joan Bennett followed in episode 17 with the queen of slapstick herself, Carole Lombard!

Sources:
Ankerich, M.G. (2015) Dangerous Curves atop Hollywood Heels: The Lives, Careers, and Misfortunes of 14 Hard-Luck Girls of the Silent Screen. Albany: BearManor Media.

Bogdanovich, P. (1997) Who The Devil Made It: Conversations with Legendary Film Directors. New York: Ballantine Books.

Callahan, D. (2011) Barbara Stanwyck The Miracle Woman. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi.

Capra, F. (1997) The Name above the Title: An Autobiography. Boston: DaCapo Press.

Clash by Night (1952). Dir. Fritz Lang [DVD] RKO Pictures.

Ladies of Leisure (1930) Dir. Frank Capra [DVD} Columbia Pictures.

Stella Dallas (1937) Dir. King Vidor [DVD} United Artists.

Wilson, V. (2013) A Life of Barbara Stanwyck: Steel True 1907-1940. New York: Simon and Schuster.

Carman, Emily (2016) Independent Stardom: Freelance Women in the Hollywood Studio System. University of Texas Press

Scandals of Classic Hollywood: The Many Faces of Barbara Stanwyck –thehairpin.com/scandals-of-class…8648a2#.w82nq07ge

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bette davis

Sisters under the Skin – All About Bette – Episode 14

Part 2 of our ‘Sisters under the Skin’ series, of which Joan Crawford was featured in part 1, this episode is all about Bette. We celebrate a queen of Woman’s Pictures through three of her finest films: Of Human Bondage (1934), Marked Woman (1937) and Now, Voyager (1942).

This is also our last episode of the year but we will return in January fresh smelling with the fabulous Barbara Stanwyck.

Sisters under the Skin – All About Bette – Episode 14 by Any Ladle’s Sweet

Part 2 of our ‘Sisters under the Skin’ series, of which Joan Crawford was featured in part 1, this episode is all about Bette. We celebrate a queen of Woman’s Pictures through three of her finest films: Of Human Bondage (1934), Marked Woman (1937) and Now, Voyager (1942).

Sources:
Considine, S. (1989) Bette & Joan: The Divine Feud. New York: Dutton.

Davis, B. (1962) The Lonely Life. (with Sanford Dody). New York: Lancer Books.

— (1987) This ‘N That (with Michael Herskowitz). New York: Putnam.

Dody, S. (1980) Giving Up the Ghost: A Writer’s Life Among the Stars. Lanham: M Evans and Co.

Eckert, C. (1973) ‘The Anatomy of a Proletarian Film: Warner’s Marked Woman’ Film Quarterly Vol. 27 No. 2 (Winter 1973-1974) pp. 10-24.

Fuller, E. (1992) Me and Jezebel New York: Berkley.

Marked Woman (1937) Dir. Lloyd Bacon [DVD] Warner Brothers.

Now Voyager (1942) Dir. Irving Rapper [DVD] Warner Brothers.

Of Human Bondage (1934) Dir. James Cromwell [YouTube] RKO Pictures.

Sherman, V. (1996) Studio Affairs: My Life as a Film Director. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.

Stine, W. (1974) Mother Goddamn: Bette Davis Hawthorn Books.

sensesofcinema.com/2001/feature-articles/spinster/

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Sisters under the Skin – Joan Crawford ‘As Wobbly as the Statue of Liberty’ – Episode 13

This month is special. To celebrate our one year podcast anniversary we are devoting episode 13 to the Queen of Woman’s Pictures, Joan Crawford. No idle gossip, or mention of THAT film will intrude on the Joan love-in. We are here to celebrate Ms Crawford through three of her finest films, ‘Sadie McKee’, ‘A Woman’s Face’, and ‘The Damned Don’t Cry’. As part of our ‘Sisters under the Skin’ series, part 1 is Joan but in part 2 next month we will be discussing the incomparable Bette Davis. Bless you.

Sisters under the Skin – Joan Crawford ‘As Wobbly as the Statue of Liberty’ – Episode 13 by Any Ladle’s Sweet

This month is special. To celebrate our one year podcast anniversary we are devoting episode 13 to the Queen of Woman’s Pictures, Joan Crawford. No idle gossip, or mention of THAT film will intrude on the Joan love-in. We are here to celebrate Ms Crawford through three of her finest films, ‘Sadie McKee’, ‘A Woman’s Face’, and ‘The Damned Don’t Cry’.

Sources:
Ep 13: Joan Crawford ‘As Wobbly As The Statue of Liberty’ [the quote comes from Molly Haskell’s ground breaking study From Reverence to Rape: The Treatment of Women in the Movies in a discussion of Joan Crawford’s role as the head of a trucking company in They All Kissed the Bride]

A Woman’s Face (1941) Dir. George Cukor [DVD] MGM Studios.

Crawford, J. (1962) A Portrait of Joan: The Autobiography of Joan Crawford (with Joan Kesner Ardmore). New York: Doubleday.

Crawford, J. (1971) My Way of Life. New York: Simon and Schuster.

Haskell, M. (1973) From Reverence to Rape: The Treatment of Women in the Movies. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Newquist, R. (1980) Conversations with Joan Crawford. Secaucus: Citadel Press.

Sherman, V. (1996) Studio Affairs: My Life as a Film Director. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.

Sadie McKee (1934) Dir. Clarence Brown [DVD] MGM Studios.

Spoto, D. (2012) Possessed: The Life of Joan Crawford. London: Arrow Books.

Springer, J. (1973) Joan Crawford at Town Hall. Available at: www.youtube.com/watch?v=OeSwnYo_4hw

The Damned Don’t Cry (1950) Dir. Vincent Sherman [DVD] Warner Brothers.

Interview clip at end: The Louella Parsons Show, original airing November 9th, 1947.www.youtube.com/watch?v=nEJlwwRyO…&feature=youtu.be

Lukas, Karli. (2000) A Woman’s Face, Senses of Cinema sensesofcinema.com/2000/cteq/woman/

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all that heaven allows

The Melodramas Part 2: Douglas Sirk – Heaven is Stingy – Episode 12

Episode 12! Part 2 of a 2 part series on the melodramas of the ’30’s and ’50’s continues with the lush and exquisite films of Douglas Sirk. We named our episode ‘Heaven is stingy’ as it’s a great quote from Sirk in his interview with Jon Halliday (Sirk on Sirk) where he discusses the title of ‘All That Heaven Allows’ – “The studio loved the title All That Heaven Allows. They thought it meant you could have everything you wanted. I meant it exactly the other way around. As far as I am concerned, heaven is stingy”.

The Melodramas Part 2: Douglas Sirk – Heaven is Stingy – Episode 12 by Any Ladle’s Sweet

Episode 12! Part 2 of a 2 part series on the melodramas of the ’30’s and ’50’s continues with the lush and exquisite films of Douglas Sirk. We named our episode ‘Heaven is stingy’ as it’s a great quote from Sirk in his interview with Jon Halliday (Sirk on Sirk) where he discusses the title of ‘All That Heaven Allows’ – “The studio loved the title All That Heaven Allows.

Sources:
All I Desire (1953) Dir. Douglas Sirk. [DVD] Universal Pictures.

All that Heaven Allows (1955) Dir. Douglas Sirk [DVD] Universal Pictures.

Brody, R. (2014) ‘John M. Stahl’s When Tomorrow Comes’ The New Yorker 18 September. Available at: www.newyorker.com/culture/richard-brody/john- stahl-when- tomorrow-comes

Halliday, J. (1971) Sirk on Sirk: Conversations with Jon Halliday. New York: Faber.

Landy, Marcia (1991)Imitations of Life: A reader on film and television melodrama. Wayne State University Press.

Imitation of Life (1959) Dir. Douglas Sirk [DVD] Universal Pictures.

Interlude (1957) Dir. Douglas Sirk [DVD] Universal Pictures.

Magnificent Obsession (1954) Dir. Douglas Sirk [DVD] Universal Pictures.

Ryan, T. (2014) ‘The Adaptation and the Remake: from John M. Stahl’s When Tomorrow Comes to Douglas Sirk’s Interlude’ Senses of Cinema March. Available at: sensesofcinema.com/2014/feature-articles/the-adaptation-and- the-remake- from-john-m-stahls- when-tomorrow- comes-to- douglas-sirks- interlude/

There’s Always Tomorrow (1955) Dir. Douglas Sirk. [DVD] Universal Pictures.

The Vanity Tables of Douglas Sirk (2015) Dir. Mark Rappaport [online archive]

Written on the Wind (1956) Dir. Douglas Sirk [archive.org] Universal Pictures.

Zu neuen Ufern (1937) Dir. Detlef Sierck [archive.org] UFA. (available here to watch with English subs.archive.org/details/ZuNeuenUfern1937)

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