anita loos

Anita Loos – Queen of Wit and Sass Supreme – Episode 24

In episode 24, we discuss the darling of the silent intertitle, mother of sass mouth dames in early talking pictures, raconteur, and all-round solid gold good guy, Anita Loos. We discuss selections of her witty writing on her experience working in Hollywood during the golden era. Stories from Kiss Hollywood Goodbye (1974), Fate Keeps on Happening (1984), Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1925) and A Girl Like I (1966). We also discuss two of her finest scriptwriting examples in Blondie of the Follies (1932) and The Girl From Missouri (1934).

Sources:
Beauchamp, C. and Loos, M.A., Eds. (2003) Anita Loos Rediscovered: Film Treatments and Fiction by Anita Loos. Berkeley: University of California Press.
Beauchamp, C. (1997) Without Lying Down: Frances Marion and the Powerful Women of Early Hollywood Berkeley: University of California Press.
Blondie of the Follies (1932) Dir. Edmund Goulding [DVD] MGM.
Carey, G. (1988) Anita Loos: A Biography London: Bloomsbury.
Loos, A. (1925) Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1992) London: Penguin.
Loos, A. (1966) A Girl Like I New York: Viking.
Loos, A. (1974) Kiss Hollywood Goodbye London: W.H Allen.
Loos, A. (1977) Cast of Thousands New York: Grosset & Dunlap.
Loos, A. (1984) Fate Keeps on Happening: Adventures of Lorelei Lee and Other Writings. London: Harrap.
Red-Headed Woman (1932) Dir. Jack Conway [DVD] MGM.
The Girl from Missouri (1934) Dir. Jack Conway [DVD] MGM.

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Sisters under the Skin – Joan Crawford ‘As Wobbly as the Statue of Liberty’ – Episode 13

This month is special. To celebrate our one year podcast anniversary we are devoting episode 13 to the Queen of Woman’s Pictures, Joan Crawford. No idle gossip, or mention of THAT film will intrude on the Joan love-in. We are here to celebrate Ms Crawford through three of her finest films, ‘Sadie McKee’, ‘A Woman’s Face’, and ‘The Damned Don’t Cry’. As part of our ‘Sisters under the Skin’ series, part 1 is Joan but in part 2 next month we will be discussing the incomparable Bette Davis. Bless you.

Sisters under the Skin – Joan Crawford ‘As Wobbly as the Statue of Liberty’ – Episode 13 by Any Ladle’s Sweet

This month is special. To celebrate our one year podcast anniversary we are devoting episode 13 to the Queen of Woman’s Pictures, Joan Crawford. No idle gossip, or mention of THAT film will intrude on the Joan love-in. We are here to celebrate Ms Crawford through three of her finest films, ‘Sadie McKee’, ‘A Woman’s Face’, and ‘The Damned Don’t Cry’.

Sources:
Ep 13: Joan Crawford ‘As Wobbly As The Statue of Liberty’ [the quote comes from Molly Haskell’s ground breaking study From Reverence to Rape: The Treatment of Women in the Movies in a discussion of Joan Crawford’s role as the head of a trucking company in They All Kissed the Bride]

A Woman’s Face (1941) Dir. George Cukor [DVD] MGM Studios.

Crawford, J. (1962) A Portrait of Joan: The Autobiography of Joan Crawford (with Joan Kesner Ardmore). New York: Doubleday.

Crawford, J. (1971) My Way of Life. New York: Simon and Schuster.

Haskell, M. (1973) From Reverence to Rape: The Treatment of Women in the Movies. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Newquist, R. (1980) Conversations with Joan Crawford. Secaucus: Citadel Press.

Sherman, V. (1996) Studio Affairs: My Life as a Film Director. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.

Sadie McKee (1934) Dir. Clarence Brown [DVD] MGM Studios.

Spoto, D. (2012) Possessed: The Life of Joan Crawford. London: Arrow Books.

Springer, J. (1973) Joan Crawford at Town Hall. Available at: www.youtube.com/watch?v=OeSwnYo_4hw

The Damned Don’t Cry (1950) Dir. Vincent Sherman [DVD] Warner Brothers.

Interview clip at end: The Louella Parsons Show, original airing November 9th, 1947.www.youtube.com/watch?v=nEJlwwRyO…&feature=youtu.be

Lukas, Karli. (2000) A Woman’s Face, Senses of Cinema sensesofcinema.com/2000/cteq/woman/

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all that heaven allows

The Melodramas Part 2: Douglas Sirk – Heaven is Stingy – Episode 12

Episode 12! Part 2 of a 2 part series on the melodramas of the ’30’s and ’50’s continues with the lush and exquisite films of Douglas Sirk. We named our episode ‘Heaven is stingy’ as it’s a great quote from Sirk in his interview with Jon Halliday (Sirk on Sirk) where he discusses the title of ‘All That Heaven Allows’ – “The studio loved the title All That Heaven Allows. They thought it meant you could have everything you wanted. I meant it exactly the other way around. As far as I am concerned, heaven is stingy”.

The Melodramas Part 2: Douglas Sirk – Heaven is Stingy – Episode 12 by Any Ladle’s Sweet

Episode 12! Part 2 of a 2 part series on the melodramas of the ’30’s and ’50’s continues with the lush and exquisite films of Douglas Sirk. We named our episode ‘Heaven is stingy’ as it’s a great quote from Sirk in his interview with Jon Halliday (Sirk on Sirk) where he discusses the title of ‘All That Heaven Allows’ – “The studio loved the title All That Heaven Allows.

Sources:
All I Desire (1953) Dir. Douglas Sirk. [DVD] Universal Pictures.

All that Heaven Allows (1955) Dir. Douglas Sirk [DVD] Universal Pictures.

Brody, R. (2014) ‘John M. Stahl’s When Tomorrow Comes’ The New Yorker 18 September. Available at: www.newyorker.com/culture/richard-brody/john- stahl-when- tomorrow-comes

Halliday, J. (1971) Sirk on Sirk: Conversations with Jon Halliday. New York: Faber.

Landy, Marcia (1991)Imitations of Life: A reader on film and television melodrama. Wayne State University Press.

Imitation of Life (1959) Dir. Douglas Sirk [DVD] Universal Pictures.

Interlude (1957) Dir. Douglas Sirk [DVD] Universal Pictures.

Magnificent Obsession (1954) Dir. Douglas Sirk [DVD] Universal Pictures.

Ryan, T. (2014) ‘The Adaptation and the Remake: from John M. Stahl’s When Tomorrow Comes to Douglas Sirk’s Interlude’ Senses of Cinema March. Available at: sensesofcinema.com/2014/feature-articles/the-adaptation-and- the-remake- from-john-m-stahls- when-tomorrow- comes-to- douglas-sirks- interlude/

There’s Always Tomorrow (1955) Dir. Douglas Sirk. [DVD] Universal Pictures.

The Vanity Tables of Douglas Sirk (2015) Dir. Mark Rappaport [online archive]

Written on the Wind (1956) Dir. Douglas Sirk [archive.org] Universal Pictures.

Zu neuen Ufern (1937) Dir. Detlef Sierck [archive.org] UFA. (available here to watch with English subs.archive.org/details/ZuNeuenUfern1937)

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Fizz on the Soda: Ginger Rogers and Joan Blondell – Episode 9

Episode 9! This month we’re discussing women in showbusiness, focusing on two stars who started out their film careers pounding the stage circuit hoping to make it big. Ginger Rogers and Joan Blondell. He’s a Keeper this month is the wonderful Peter Lorre.

In the 1930’s, Hollywood became expert at creating fantasies for its audiences. Beautiful girls in skimpy costumes. in Busby Berkley designed spectacles singing ‘We’re in the money, we’re in the money’ gave audiences a momentary escape from the greyness and worry of reality. The Great Depression affected all Americans and led to thousands of movie theaters closing and ticket sales plummeted, in saying that Hollywood was still in the business of entertaining people. In 1933 60 million people still went to the movies. Life on the stage was very tough with thousands of girls audtioning and only a handful making it in the pick. Backstage there would be 25 girls to one dressing room, bad lighting, everyone stealing each others make-up, in-fighting and holding off advances from creepy stage managers. Ginger and Joan came up the hard way and by 1933 were two of biggest stars at the time.

Curtain up!

Fizz on the Soda: Ginger Rogers and Joan Blondell – Episode 9 by Any Ladle’s Sweet

Episode 9! This month we’re discussing women in showbusiness, focusing on two stars who started out their film careers pounding the stage circuit hoping to make it big. Ginger Rogers and Joan Blondell. He’s a Keeper this month is the wonderful Peter Lorre. In the 1930’s, Hollywood became expert at creating fantasies for its audiences.

Sources:
42 nd Street (1933) Dir. Lloyd Bacon. [DVD] Warner Bros.

Bawden, J and Miller, R. (2016) ‘Interview with Joan Blondell’ in Conversations with Classic Film Stars: Interviews from Hollywood’s Golden Era. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.

Blondell, J. (1972) Center Door Fancy. New York: Delacorte Press.

Broadway Bad (1933) Dir. Sidney Lanfield. [YouTube] Warner Bros.

Dames (1934) Dir. Ray Enright & Busby Berkeley. [DVD] Warner Bros.

Der Verlorene ‘The Lost One’ (1951) Dir. Peter Lorre [YouTube] National-Filmverleih.

Gold Diggers of 1933 (1933) Dir. Mervyn LeRoy [DVD] Warner Bros.

Havana Widows (1933) Dir. Ray Enright [DVD] Warner Bros.

Kennedy, M. (2007) Joan Blondell: A Life Between Takes. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi.

M (1931) Dir. Fritz Lang [YouTube] Vereinigte Star-Film.

Mad Love (1935) Dir. Karl Freund. [DVD] Metro-Goldwyn- Mayer Studios.

Maltese Falcon (1941) Dir. John Huston [DVD] Warner Bros.

Nightmare Alley (1947) Dir. Edmund Goulding [DVD] 20 th Century Fox.

Professional Sweetheart (1933) Dir. Wiliam A. Seiter [YouTube] RKO.

Stage Door (1937) Dir. Gregory La Cava. [DVD] RKO

Swing Time (1936) Dir. George Stevens [DVD] RKO.

Rogers, G. Ginger: My Story. New York: It Books.

Youngkin, S.D. (2005) The Lost One: A Life of Peter Lorre. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.

Gourley, Catherine. (2008) Rosie and Mrs America: Perceptions of Women in the 1930’s and 1940’s. Twenty First Century Books.

glamourdaze.com/2013/01/inside-a-…ressing-room.html

Music excerpt from 42nd St (1933), music and lyrics by Al Dublin and Harry Warren.

Music excerpt from Gold Diggers of 1933 (1933), music and lyrics by Al Dublin and Harry Warren.

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What Do Women Want?: Female Desire in Film 1918 – 1954 – Episode 8

What do women want?
What do they do when desire is repressed or thwarted?
What about desire and female spectatorship?
Moving the discussion on female desire and sexuality out of the dry academic arena, we focus on women’s conscious or experiential desire present on-screen. The films we discuss fit into various categories such as Repressed Desire, Masochistic Desire, Misdirected Desire, Fantasy, Forbidden Desire and Drag. We have framed this episode to be a companion piece to our third episode on the Pre-Code’s so sit back, relax and prepare to get hot and bothered!

What Do Women Want?: Female Desire in Film 1918 – 1954 – Episode 8 by Any Ladle’s Sweet

What do women want? What do they do when desire is repressed or thwarted? What about desire and female spectatorship? Moving the discussion on female desire and sexuality out of the dry academic arena, we focus on women’s conscious or experiential desire present on-screen.

Sources:
Bed and Sofa (1927) Dir. Abram Room www.youtube.com/watch?v=mrG3FA2lmiI

Ecstasy (1933) Dir. Gustav Machatý
vimeo.com/99946740

Gone With The Wind (1939) Dir. Victor Fleming [DVD]

I Don’t Want to Be a Man (1918) Dir. Ernst Lubitsch
www.youtube.com/watch?v=non55zCjx8Y

It’s Love I’m After (1937) Dir. Archie Mayo [DVD].

Johnny Guitar (1954) Dir. Nicholas Ray [Irish Film Institute cinema].

Lamarr, H. (1966) Ecstasy and Me: My Life as a Woman. Greenwich: Fawcett.

Lifeboat (1944) Dir. Alfred Hitchcock [DVD]

Liliom (1934) Dir. Fritz Lang
www.youtube.com/watch?v=FTv6pUDyvEA

Madam Satan (1930) Dir. Cecil B DeMille (ball scene)
www.dailymotion.com/video/x16we2_ma…ty-1930-1_music

Madchen in Uniform (1933) Dir. Leontine Sagan
www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Bj1Z5Pd7vc

Rebecca (1940) Dir. Alfred Hitchcock [DVD].

Sunset Boulevard (1950) Dir. Billy Wilder [DVD].

The Bitter Tea of General Yen (1933) Dir. Frank Capra [DVD].

The Cabin in the Cotton (1932) Dir. Michael Curtiz
www.dailymotion.com/video/x37gkjo

The Heiress (1949) Dir. William Wyler [DVD].

These Three (1936) Dir. William Wyler [DVD].

The Smiling Madame Beudet (1923) Dir. Germaine Dulac
www.youtube.com/watch?v=1VA8NBhipvs

Music sample: An Ocasional Man, Martin-Blane, Sung by Marion Ryan (1962)[Columbia Records].

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