gloria grahame

Gloria Grahame – Sister Under the Mink – Episode 21

This month we’re righting some wrongs here at Any Ladle’s Sweet. Gloria Grahame shone in support roles in many noir films, under many great directors but she references her mother as her only influence on her acting style. Negative stories surrounding her personal life overtook her talent and hard work and fact and fiction mixed into a tawdry Hollywood Babylon style mess. Gloria was a unique talent and we are here to celebrate her hard work and mesmerising onscreen presence. We discuss 3 of her finest, In a Lonely Place (1950), The Big Heat (1953), and Human Desire (1954).

Sources:
Callahan, D. (2008) ‘Fatal Instincts: The Dangerous Pout of Gloria Grahame’

Bright Lights 30 April [Available at: brightlightsfilm.com/fatal-instinct…/#.WX9Yq4jyvIV].

Chase, D (1997) ‘Gloria Grahame: In Praise of the Dirty Mind’ Film Comment September/October [Available at: www.filmcomment.com/article/gloria-grahame/].

Curcio, V. (1989) Suicide Blonde: The Life of Gloria Grahame. New York: William Morrow and Company.

Eisenschitz, B. (1996) Nicholas Ray: An American Journey translated by Tom Milne. New York: Faber & Faber.

Gunning, T. (2000) The Films of Fritz Lang: Allegories of Vision and Modernity. London, BFI with Palgrave Macmillan.

Hagen, R and Wagner, L. (2004) Killer Tomatoes: Fifteen Tough Noir Dames. Jefferson: McFarland.

Human Desire (1954) Dir. Fritz Lang [YouTube] Columbia Pictures.

In a Lonely Place (1950) Dir. Nicholas Ray. [DVR] Columbia Pictures.

Ray, N. (1993) I Was Interrupted: Nicholas Ray on Making Movies Berkeley: University of California Press.

Rickey, C. (2017) ‘In a Lonely Place: Film noir as an opera of male fury’

Library of America 28 June [Available at: www.loa.org/news-and-views/1301…-opera-of-male-fury].

The Big Heat (1953) Dir. Fritz Lang [DVD] Columbia Pictures.

Turner, P. (1986) Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool. London: Pan Books.

Share
mary astor

Mary Astor: Bitch’s Cauldron – Episode 18

Mary Astor was in the words of David Niven a woman who “looked like a beautiful and highly shockable nun with the vocabulary of a long shoreman.” Dominated by a brutish money grabbing father, hated by her mother, pushed into film acting and some disasterous marriages and affairs, it was a long time before the real Mary Astor came into her own. A woman consumed by her many passions and demons, she brought a vitality, intelligence and wit to her roles that was ahead of its time. Join us as explore her best work in three films: The Maltese Falcon (1941), The Great Lie (1941) and The Palm Beach Story (1942).

Sources:

Astor, M. (1959) My Story: An Autobiography New York: Doubleday.

Astor, M. (1967) Mary Astor: A Life on Film 1 st British edition 1973. London: W.H. Allen.

Huston, J. (1980) An Open Book New York: Knopf.

Sorel, E. (2016) Mary Astor’s Purple Diary: The Great American Sex Scandal of 1936 New York: Liveright Publishing Company.

Sturges, P. (1990) Preston Sturges on Preston Sturges Adapted and edited by Sandy Sturges. New York: Simon and Schuster.

The Great Lie (1941) Dir. Edmund Goulding (DVD) Warner Brothers.

The Maltese Falcon (1941) Dir. John Huston (DVR) Warner Brothers.

The Palm Beach Story (1942) Dir. Preston Sturges (DVD) Paramount Pictures.

Share
joan bennett

Joan Bennett: Hollywood’s Shimmering Vagabond – Episode 16

In episode 16 we focus on the ‘quiet Bennett’ compared to her volatile film star sister Constance. Joan was fiery in a more subtle way, she didn’t think much of her film career and felt more at home on the stage like her father, the legendary Richard Bennett. She quoted him often in her autobiography ‘The Bennett Playbill’, one of her favourite lines being “We are vagabonds to the heart and we are not ashamed of it”. She said “Well, I’m still a “vagabond” and I’m shamelessly proud of it.”

Her film career was not a long one and she made a little over 70 films but she made a lasting impression, especially in her noir work with Frtiz Lang. We’ve chosen for this episode Private Worlds (1935), Scarlet Street (1945) and The Reckless Moment (1949).

Sources:
Bennett, J. (1970) The Bennett Playbill: Five Generations of the Famous Theater Family (with Lois Kibbee). New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston.

Kellow, B. (2004) The Bennetts: An Acting Family Lexington: The University Press of Kentucky.

Private Worlds (1935) Dir. Gregory La Cava [DVD] Paramount Pictures.

Scarlett Street (1945) Dir. Fritz Lang [YouTube] Universal Pictures.

The Reckless Moment (1949) Dir. Max Ophüls [DVR} Columbia Pictures.

www.fandor.com/keyframe/stretche…9s-scarlet-street

Share
barbara stanwyck

Barbara Stanwyck: Ball of Fire – Episode 15

Bright, hard boiled yet deeply human, earthy, independent, consummate professional, passionate, conservative, world weary, astute, confident, funny, strong, loyal…you really can’t pin Barbara Stanwyck down to any one thing. In episode 15 we discuss (in our humble opinion) three films that showcase her best work – Ladies of Leisure (1930), Stella Dallas (1937), and Clash by Night (1952).

Stay tuned for episode 16 in which we discuss the wonderful Joan Bennett followed in episode 17 with the queen of slapstick herself, Carole Lombard!

Sources:
Ankerich, M.G. (2015) Dangerous Curves atop Hollywood Heels: The Lives, Careers, and Misfortunes of 14 Hard-Luck Girls of the Silent Screen. Albany: BearManor Media.

Bogdanovich, P. (1997) Who The Devil Made It: Conversations with Legendary Film Directors. New York: Ballantine Books.

Callahan, D. (2011) Barbara Stanwyck The Miracle Woman. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi.

Capra, F. (1997) The Name above the Title: An Autobiography. Boston: DaCapo Press.

Clash by Night (1952). Dir. Fritz Lang [DVD] RKO Pictures.

Ladies of Leisure (1930) Dir. Frank Capra [DVD} Columbia Pictures.

Stella Dallas (1937) Dir. King Vidor [DVD} United Artists.

Wilson, V. (2013) A Life of Barbara Stanwyck: Steel True 1907-1940. New York: Simon and Schuster.

Carman, Emily (2016) Independent Stardom: Freelance Women in the Hollywood Studio System. University of Texas Press

Scandals of Classic Hollywood: The Many Faces of Barbara Stanwyck –thehairpin.com/scandals-of-class…8648a2#.w82nq07ge

Share

Sisters under the Skin – Joan Crawford ‘As Wobbly as the Statue of Liberty’ – Episode 13

This month is special. To celebrate our one year podcast anniversary we are devoting episode 13 to the Queen of Woman’s Pictures, Joan Crawford. No idle gossip, or mention of THAT film will intrude on the Joan love-in. We are here to celebrate Ms Crawford through three of her finest films, ‘Sadie McKee’, ‘A Woman’s Face’, and ‘The Damned Don’t Cry’. As part of our ‘Sisters under the Skin’ series, part 1 is Joan but in part 2 next month we will be discussing the incomparable Bette Davis. Bless you.

Sisters under the Skin – Joan Crawford ‘As Wobbly as the Statue of Liberty’ – Episode 13 by Any Ladle’s Sweet

This month is special. To celebrate our one year podcast anniversary we are devoting episode 13 to the Queen of Woman’s Pictures, Joan Crawford. No idle gossip, or mention of THAT film will intrude on the Joan love-in. We are here to celebrate Ms Crawford through three of her finest films, ‘Sadie McKee’, ‘A Woman’s Face’, and ‘The Damned Don’t Cry’.

Sources:
Ep 13: Joan Crawford ‘As Wobbly As The Statue of Liberty’ [the quote comes from Molly Haskell’s ground breaking study From Reverence to Rape: The Treatment of Women in the Movies in a discussion of Joan Crawford’s role as the head of a trucking company in They All Kissed the Bride]

A Woman’s Face (1941) Dir. George Cukor [DVD] MGM Studios.

Crawford, J. (1962) A Portrait of Joan: The Autobiography of Joan Crawford (with Joan Kesner Ardmore). New York: Doubleday.

Crawford, J. (1971) My Way of Life. New York: Simon and Schuster.

Haskell, M. (1973) From Reverence to Rape: The Treatment of Women in the Movies. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Newquist, R. (1980) Conversations with Joan Crawford. Secaucus: Citadel Press.

Sherman, V. (1996) Studio Affairs: My Life as a Film Director. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.

Sadie McKee (1934) Dir. Clarence Brown [DVD] MGM Studios.

Spoto, D. (2012) Possessed: The Life of Joan Crawford. London: Arrow Books.

Springer, J. (1973) Joan Crawford at Town Hall. Available at: www.youtube.com/watch?v=OeSwnYo_4hw

The Damned Don’t Cry (1950) Dir. Vincent Sherman [DVD] Warner Brothers.

Interview clip at end: The Louella Parsons Show, original airing November 9th, 1947.www.youtube.com/watch?v=nEJlwwRyO…&feature=youtu.be

Lukas, Karli. (2000) A Woman’s Face, Senses of Cinema sensesofcinema.com/2000/cteq/woman/

Share