rosalind russell

Rosalind Russell: Dollface Hick – Episode 22

Orry-Kelly recalled a conversation with Roz during the filming of Auntie Mame “On one occasion I said to her ‘You know, you’re a pretty wonderful girl and you’ve been a wonderful wife. In fact, you’ve been a wonderful mother.’ A naughty Mame-ish gleam came into her eyes as she said, ‘Yes, and I’m a hell of a lover’”. Episode 22 is devoted to this gargantuan superwoman of the silver screen. A unique comedic talent who always displayed class and good humour in whatever picture she worked on. In our opinion, Roz was ‘top drawer’. We discuss three of her finest: The Women (1939), His Girl Friday (1940), and Auntie Mame (1958).

THAT outfit, long thought deleted from the final version of the film but we found its brief appearance!

rosalind russellrosalind russell

Resources:
Auntie Mame (1958) Dir. Morton DaCosta [DVD] Warner Bros.
Dennis, P. (1955) Auntie Mame: An Irreverent Escapade New York: Penguin.
Haskell, M. (1973) From Reverence to Rape: The Treatment of Women in the Movies Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
His Girl Friday (1940) Dir. Howard Hawks [YouTube] Columbia Pictures.
Life is a Banquet: The Rosalind Russell Story (2009) Narr. Kathleen Turner [DVD] Total Media Group.
Russell, R. (1977) Life is a Banquet (with Chris Chase) New York: Ace Books.
The Women (1939) Dir. George Cukor [DVD] MGM.
seul-le-cinema.blogspot.ie/2008/12/women-1939.html
www.criterion.com/current/posts/43…rfect-remarriage

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Gif Corner

Adopt a GIF. Click on each to download. More coming soon!

All GIFs by Danielle so use them however you please.

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Independent Vision: The Films of Dorothy Arzner – Episode 5

Dorothy Arzner was one of the very few women who established a name for herself as a director in the film industry of the 1920s and ’30s, what remains to this day the largest body of work by a woman director within the studio system, for years she was the sole female member of the Directors Guild. Nonetheless, she has been virtually ignored in most film histories. It was only with the emergence of ’70s feminism that scholars began to reclaim women such as Arzner from relative obscurity. She was central to the development of the studio system, the genre film, the development of sound technology (inventor of the fishpole microphone), the star system, and the representation of women in the Hollywood mainstream.

However brief her film career, she stands as an early example of a woman who insisted upon creative autonomy and control in her work. Another reason for retiring from Hollywood was that she felt that the kind of pictures she was interested in making were no longer encouraged or supported in Hollywood.

Arzner’s directorial style was consistently revealed by an emphasis on costume and that changes in a woman’s life and relationships to each other were emphasised through costume and dress. As the title of a Jane Gaines essay put it “dress tells the woman’s story’ Her main themes focused on female friendship and communities, the uneasy navigation of the relationships between men and women, class differences and always with an emphasis on performance and costume. For much of Arzner’s work, sexuality stands as a threat to women’s community. Women, in the heterosexual contract, must play their part, as opposed to the more “honest’ form of love between women.

A quote from director Francine Parker in an essay about Dorothy sums up her idea of the director’s role involving both authority and collaboration:
“…a woman has a different point of view on life. And the world does take on a rather startling and surprising look when observed through the eyes of a skilled, talented, hard-working, learned and thoroughly unintimidated female”.

Listen to the episode here.

Sources:
Casella, D. (2009) ‘What women want: the complex world of Dorothy Arzner and her cinematic women
The Journal of Cinema & Media Vol. 50 Issue 1/2, pp. 235-270.
Christopher Strong (1933) Dir. Dorothy Arzner [DVD] RKO.
Craig’s Wife (1936) Dir. Dorothy Arzner [Internet Archive] Columbia.
Dance, Girl, Dance (1940) Dir. Dorothy Arzner [DVD] RKO.
First Comes Courage (1943) Dir. Dorothy Arzner [Internet Archive] Columbia.
Honor Among Lovers (1931) Dir. Dorothy Arzner [YouTube] Paramount.
Mayne, J. (1994) Directed by Dorothy Arzner. Bloomington & Indianapolis: Indiana UP.
Merrily We Go to Hell (1932) Dir. Dorothy Arzner [DVD] Paramount.
The Bride Wore Red (1937) Dir. Dorothy Arzner [DVD] MGM.
The Wild Party (1929) Dir. Dorothy Arzner [Internet Archive] Paramount.
www.bfi.org.uk/news-opinion/sigh…r-queen-hollywood
sensesofcinema.com/2003/great-directors/arzner/

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Any Ladle’s Sweet That Dishes Out Some Gravy! The Women – Episode 4

It’s all about the women! In our 4th episode we delve deep into the 1939 all female classic, The Women. Directed by George Cukor, this biting social satire includes an impressive ensemble cast, Joan Crawford, Norma Shearer, and Paulette Goddard to name but a few. Shining with a sharp script by Anita Loos, we discuss the often overlooked subtleties and artistry of this under-appreciated film.

Any Ladle’s Sweet That Dishes Out Some Gravy! The Women – Episode 4 by Any Ladle’s Sweet

It’s all about the women! In our 4th episode we delve deep into the 1939 all female classic, The Women. Directed by George Cukor, this biting social satire includes an impressive ensemble cast, Joan Crawford, Norma Shearer, and Paulette Goddard to name but a few.

Sources:
Nugent, F.S. (1939) ‘Review: The Women’. The New York Times, 22 September.
www.nytimes.com/movie/review?res=…1DFBF668382629EDE
Carey, G. (1988) Anita Loos: A biography. London: Bloomsbury.
Considine, S. (1989) Bette & Joan: the divine feud. London: Sphere.
Crawford, J. (1962) A portrait of Joan: The Autobiography of Joan Crawford. (with Jane Kesner Ardmore). New York: Doubleday.
Fontaine, J (1978) No bed of roses. New York: Morrow.
Lambert, G. (1973) On Cukor. London: W.H. Allen.
Loos, A. (1974) Kiss Hollywood goodbye. London: W.H. Allen.
Lugowski, D.M. (2011) ‘Norma Shearer and Joan Crawford: rivals at the glamour factory’, in McLean, A.L (ed.) Glamour in a golden age: movie stars of the 1930s. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press.
McGilligan, P. (1991) George Cukor: A double life. London: Faber and Faber.
Russell, R. (1977) Life is a banquet. (with Chris Chase). New York: Random House.
Thomas, B. (1978) Joan Crawford: a biography. London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson.
The Women (1939) Dir. George Cukor. [DVD] MGM.
seul-le-cinema.blogspot.ie/2008/12/women-1939.html

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