rosalind russell

Rosalind Russell: Dollface Hick – Episode 22

Orry-Kelly recalled a conversation with Roz during the filming of Auntie Mame “On one occasion I said to her ‘You know, you’re a pretty wonderful girl and you’ve been a wonderful wife. In fact, you’ve been a wonderful mother.’ A naughty Mame-ish gleam came into her eyes as she said, ‘Yes, and I’m a hell of a lover’”. Episode 22 is devoted to this gargantuan superwoman of the silver screen. A unique comedic talent who always displayed class and good humour in whatever picture she worked on. In our opinion, Roz was ‘top drawer’. We discuss three of her finest: The Women (1939), His Girl Friday (1940), and Auntie Mame (1958).

THAT outfit, long thought deleted from the final version of the film but we found its brief appearance!

rosalind russellrosalind russell

Resources:
Auntie Mame (1958) Dir. Morton DaCosta [DVD] Warner Bros.
Dennis, P. (1955) Auntie Mame: An Irreverent Escapade New York: Penguin.
Haskell, M. (1973) From Reverence to Rape: The Treatment of Women in the Movies Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
His Girl Friday (1940) Dir. Howard Hawks [YouTube] Columbia Pictures.
Life is a Banquet: The Rosalind Russell Story (2009) Narr. Kathleen Turner [DVD] Total Media Group.
Russell, R. (1977) Life is a Banquet (with Chris Chase) New York: Ace Books.
The Women (1939) Dir. George Cukor [DVD] MGM.
seul-le-cinema.blogspot.ie/2008/12/women-1939.html
www.criterion.com/current/posts/43…rfect-remarriage

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louise brooks

Louise Brooks – Naked on Her Goat – Episode 20

Actress Dorothy Mackaill said of Louise “She was a peculiar girl, odd, different but she was damned attractive, and I’d say good-humoured, not difficult about it all. She used to laugh and shrug her shoulders and say ‘the hell with it’. But they got what they wanted. All they had to do with Brooksie was turn the camera on.” There really was no one like Louise and we’re dedicating our twentieth episode to this enigmatic dancer turned actress turned writer. We discuss 3 of her finest films: Pandora’s Box (1929), The Diary of a Lost Girl (1929) and Prix de beauté (1930).

Viva Louise!

Resources:
Brooks, L. (1982) Lulu in Hollywood New York: Knopf.

Eisner, Lotte. (1952) The Haunted Screen: Expressionism in the German Cinema and the Influence of Max Reinhardt: University of California Press

sensesofcinema.com/2010/feature-ar…-tabula-rasa-3/

Bright Lights Film Journal [Available at: brightlightsfilm.com/martyrdom-lulu-louise-brooks- 100/#.WWSi7YTyvIU].

Diary of a Lost Girl (1929) Dir. G.W. Pabst [DVD] Pabst-Film.

Pandora’s Box (1929) Dir. G.W. Pabst [DVD] Süd-Film.

Paris, B. (1989) Louise Brooks New York: Knopf.

Prix de Beauté (1930). Dir. Augusto Genina [internet archive] Sofar-Film.

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irene dunne

Irene Dunne – ‘She longed to be called baby’ – Episode 19

Irene Dunne was the queen of melodrama, comedy and musicals, a leading lady adored by all and seen by female audiences as an ‘every woman’. Many critics over the years have labelled Irene as either the ‘female Cary Grant’ or the refined lady who excelled in maternal roles. We at Any Ladle’s Sweet beg to differ and offer a more nuanced view of this deeply funny lady who always longed to be called ‘baby’. We discuss 3 of her finest roles: Ann Vickers (1933, Theodora Goes Wild (1936), and Unfinished Business (1941).

Sources:
Ann Vickers (1933). Dir. John Cromwell [DVD] RKO Pictures.

Basinger, J. (2007) The Star Machine. New York: Vintage.

Bawden, J. and Miller, R. (2016) Conversations with Classic Film Stars: Interviews from Hollywood’s Golden Era. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.

Bogdonovich, P. (1997) Who the Devil Made It: Conversations with Legendary Film Directors. New York: Ballantine.

Carman, E. (2016) Independent Stardom: Freelance Women in the Hollywood Studio System. Austin: University of Texas Press.

Douglas, M. (1986) See You at the Movies: The Autobiography of Melvyn Douglas. (with Tom Arthur) Lanham: University Press of America.

Gehring, W.D. (2006) Irene Dunne: First Lady of Hollywood. Lanham: Scarecrow Press.

McCourt: J. (1980) ‘Irene Dunne: The Awful Truth’ Film Comment 16.1 pp. 26-32.

Theodora Goes Wild (1936) Dir. Richard Boleslawski [YouTube] Columbia Pictures.

Unfinished Business (1941) Dir. Gregory La Cava [YouTube] Universal Studios.

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carole lombard

Carole Lombard: Hoyden, Screwball, Mogul in the Making – Episode 17

Ice-blonde with blue piercing eyes and great gams, Carole surprised many with her salty tongue, endless pranks and keen head for business and publicity. A screwball comedy queen, she also had a big heart when it came to looking after everyone she came into contact with, on and off the set. A proto feminist, she strived for better contracts and demanded her way when it came to choosing writers, directors and cinematographers for her projects. Her life was tragically brief so we want to pay homage to this great lady who was really just getting started. In episode 17 we discuss Virtue (1932), No Man of Her Own (1932) and My Man, Godfrey (1936).

Sources:
Bogdanovich, P. (1997) Who the Devil Made It: Conversations with Legendary Film Directors New York: Ballantine Books.

Carman, E. (2016) Independent Stardom: Freelance Women in the Hollywood Studio System. Austin: University of Texas Press.

My Man Godfrey (1936) Dir. Gregory La Cava [YouTube] Universal Pictures.

No Man of Her Own (1932) Dir. Wesley Ruggles [DVD] Paramount Pictures.

Swindell, L. (1975) Screwball: The Life of Carole Lombard Brattleboro: Echo Point Books and Media.

Virtue (1932) Dir. Edward Buzzell [DVD] Columbia Pictures.

Ott W. Frederick. (1972) The Films of Carole Lombard: The Citadel Press

sensesofcinema.com/2011/cteq/my-man-godfrey/

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joan bennett

Joan Bennett: Hollywood’s Shimmering Vagabond – Episode 16

In episode 16 we focus on the ‘quiet Bennett’ compared to her volatile film star sister Constance. Joan was fiery in a more subtle way, she didn’t think much of her film career and felt more at home on the stage like her father, the legendary Richard Bennett. She quoted him often in her autobiography ‘The Bennett Playbill’, one of her favourite lines being “We are vagabonds to the heart and we are not ashamed of it”. She said “Well, I’m still a “vagabond” and I’m shamelessly proud of it.”

Her film career was not a long one and she made a little over 70 films but she made a lasting impression, especially in her noir work with Frtiz Lang. We’ve chosen for this episode Private Worlds (1935), Scarlet Street (1945) and The Reckless Moment (1949).

Sources:
Bennett, J. (1970) The Bennett Playbill: Five Generations of the Famous Theater Family (with Lois Kibbee). New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston.

Kellow, B. (2004) The Bennetts: An Acting Family Lexington: The University Press of Kentucky.

Private Worlds (1935) Dir. Gregory La Cava [DVD] Paramount Pictures.

Scarlett Street (1945) Dir. Fritz Lang [YouTube] Universal Pictures.

The Reckless Moment (1949) Dir. Max Ophüls [DVR} Columbia Pictures.

www.fandor.com/keyframe/stretche…9s-scarlet-street

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